Academic Standard & Curriculum

WCIS strives to offer students a quality learning experience embedded with noble virtues, which allow students entrance to post-secondary education in the finest universities in the world.

WCIS offers a rigorous curriculum following the Texas standards. Based on Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS), the guides have been considered as functional and in use. WCIS also offers Advancement Placement courses of the College Board. WCIS prepares all students academically, socially, emotionally, and spiritually.

Korean History/culture and Korean language courses are offered for students as well.

Elementary

 

The 1st-5th grade program at WCIS rigorously and successfully equips students with a strong foundation for success in middle school and high school.

We place strong emphasis on equipping students with an extensive foundation in Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies.

Language Arts

For Language Arts, we offer reading and writing classes utilizing the world-renowned media CNN as a supplementary source. CNN10 is a highly resourceful program offered at WCIS that engages students with worldwide newsworthy content, encouraging them to seek a wide variety of perspectives and gain critical insight into the international community at large.

 ESL programs are also offered, which range from 3to 5 months for the extensive program and 4 months for the after school program.

Mathematics

WCIS Mathematics curriculum drives students to develop the ability to reason and think mathematically. Students will understand and use basic properties of the real number system. They will solve problems involving signed number operations, simple equations, order of operations, perimeter / circumference, area, surface area and volume of shapes. As a result, they will then utilize these concepts in real-life applications.

Social Studies

WCIS Social Studies curriculum invites students to not only learn about history but to prepare for their future. Elementary students will start off using IMPACT: Social Studies K-12. A dynamic, student-centered program designed to help teachers make an impact in the classroom, and to inspire students to make an impact on the world around them.

Science

Science curriculum at WCIS aims for students to develop scientific curiosity and enjoyment and understanding of how natural phenomena can be explained. Elementary students will embark on a journey using A Closer Look that takes the world around them to explain, nurture and develop their perspectives.

Arts & Manners, Bible and Atheletics

In addition to the core curriculum, WCIS education also includes Arts & Manners, Bible and Athletics.

  • Arts & Manners

WCIS raises our students to be global citizens embracing diversity with politeness and respect. They will learn to how to better communicate and behave

 

  • Bible

Students at WCIS will learn about Bible and start to build strong foundation to live the word of Gospel in their life

 

  • Athletics

Following one of WCIS’s core values, students will maintain their physical wellness through our Athletics program.

 

Middle School

Middle School is where students start to discover their talents, personal relationships are developed by active experiential learning. We help students to maintain their curiosity and passion, preparing them for success in their future.

 

The Middle School curriculum puts strong emphasis on English Art, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies with Foreign Language, Arts & Manners, Athletics and Bible courses are offered as well.

Students, from their strong foundation settled in from elementary courses, will continue to develop their English skills in middle school. In addition to standard English Art courses, classical readings will be implemented on their curriculum, challenging students with more advanced readings which will prepare them for success in high school and post-secondary education.

Mathematics

Mathematics curriculum comprises Pre-Algebra, Algebra 1 and Geometry.

Pre-Algebra includes a variety of problem solving strategies as well as basic and advanced computation procedures. This includes but is not limited to: review of natural number arithmetic, factorization of natural numbers, properties of operations, understating of variable manipulation. (This class will review the basic operations of arithmetic on whole numbers, fractions and decimals. These operations will be used in dealing with ratio, proportions, percent, simple geometry and algebra. As students master these basic concepts, they will move into basic algebra. Students will be expected to understand basic operations with integers, rational numbers, irrational, and real numbers; the use of variables; properties of numbers and of equality; solving equations and inequalities; problem solving; relations and functions; and polynomials)

Algebra 1 invites students to various ways of functions including verbal descriptions, equations, tables and graphs.

In Geometry, through the study of congruence and similarity, students develop reasoning and problem-solving skills. Students will spend time investigating angles, lines, polygons including triangles and quadrilaterals and will be introduced to trigonometric concepts.

Science

Science curriculum at WCIS offers an opportunity for students to work independently and collaboratively to find answers through research, observation, experimentation and critical thinking. Through real world application of concepts and theories, WCIS leads students to develop critical and creative thinking about research and design.

WCIS science curriculum consists of Chemistry, Biology and Physics.

Chemistry is designed to provide a detailed understanding of the interaction of matter and energy. This interaction is investigated through laboratory techniques, manipulation of chemical qualities, and problem solving applications. Scientific methodology is employed in experimental and analytical investigations, and concepts are illustrated with practical applications. Technology, including probe-ware, graphing calculators and computers, is used where appropriate. Students understand and use safety precautions with chemicals and equipment. Course objectives emphasize qualitative and quantitative study of substances and the changes that occur in them.

 

In Biology, students will explore the concept of cells, the structure and function of cells. Students will also understand the inside of the human body and Biology covers broad knowledge of living organisms and the environment, such as ecosystems and biomes.

Physics, is a one-semester honors level course in introductory physics. Concepts and quantitative applications covered in this course include mechanics (the study of motion), properties of matter, waves, electricity, magnetism, and modern physics. It will focus on types of motion, forces, momentum, and energy for the first half. Students will be asked to think creatively, to manipulate simple formulas, and to work both independently and collaboratively.

Social Studies

WCIS Social Studies curriculum consists of US History, World History, US History

Social studies curriculum at WCIS invites students to explore US History as well as World History. US History focuses on American history from antebellum America to the 21st century. From exploration of America, the American revolution, founding of the constitution, all the way to the development of World War II, Vietnam War, The Cold War, and modern America.

Students can develop additional language skills at WCIS following the international mindedness virtue of WCIS.

Chinese:

Those who wish to learn Chinese will begin to learn basic Chinese, starting from basic Chinese characters.

French:

Students begin their introduction to French by focusing on the four key areas of French: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities.

Spanish:

Students will focus on listening, speaking, reading and writing. They should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning, become familiar in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts.

Arts & Manners:

Students will engage in building effective communication skills in polite manner.

Athletics:

Fulfilling the physical wellness value of WCIS, students will engage in various sports activities.

Bible:

Students will learn more about the Bible in order to live the way of Gospel throughout their lives.

 

High School

WCIS high school curriculum prepares students for their excellence in higher education. Through rigorous curriculum, with the level of rigorous depending on each student, students will be prepared for challenging materials in college/university and continue to show their academic excellency among competition.

Graduation Requirements

WCIS graduation requirements follow TEKS and the recommendations of many colleges/universities in the USA.

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Grade Determination

In each class, a student's grade is determined by his/her attendance, participation, homework, exams, projects, and other activities as assigned by the teacher.

Grading Scale

WCIS does not rank its student. Grades are awarded on a 4 point scale (unweighted), as follows:

*Ordinary courses are weighted on scale of 4.5

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English

English 9 Composition: Students learn to analyze and interpret various literary genres. Students learn the basic skills of paragraphing, editing, essay writing, organizing and constructing effective transitions.

English 10 World Literature: Students learn to analyze and interpret various genres of literature from different countries that have different styles. Students will be exposed to diverse styles of writing and learn to appreciate.

English 11 American Literature: Students will receive an overview of American literature from the founding of the nation to contemporary pieces. Literary study will be infused with historical applications for a better understanding of the social and historical context of the readings.

English 12 British Literature: Students will receive an overview of British literature from early Anglo-Saxon to Modern. Literary terms and elements of poetry will be discussed throughout this course. Students will further improve their writing through the study of problem areas as well as regular use of response journals.

Mathematics

Geometry: Students apply properties of lines, triangles, quadrilaterals, circles, length, perimeter, area, circumference, surface area, and volume to solve real-world problems.

 

Algebra 2: Students learn linear equations, inequalities, graphs, matrices, polynomials and radical expressions, quadratic equations, functions, exponentials and logarithmic expressions, sequences and series, probability and trigonometry.

 

Pre-Calculus: Designed to prepare students for future calculus courses by covering advanced mathematical concepts, functions and theories that may not be covered in algebra and geometry, students will learn the properties of functions with the study of trigonometric, logarithmic and exponential functions. They will also learn about sequences, limits and other concepts essential to the study of calculus.

 

Calculus: Students study differentiation and integration with many applications. Limits and continuity are investigated in-depth.

 

AP Calculus AB: AP Calculus AB is an introductory college-level calculus course. Students cultivate their understanding of differential and integral calculus through engaging with real world problems represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally and using definitions and theorems to build arguments and justify conclusions as they explore concepts like change, limits, and the analysis of functions.

 

AP Calculus BC: AP Calculus BC is a college level course equivalent to a full year of calculus at most universities. The course is based on the College Board’s Advanced Placement Calculus BC curriculum, whose purpose is “developing understanding of the concepts of calculus and providing experience with its methods and applications.” The primary purpose of this course is to prepare students for the AP Exam as well as future college math courses.

 

AP Statistics: AP Statistics is a college level class for students who have been highly successful in Algebra 2 or Pre-Calculus. It covers the topics needed for the American College Board AP Statistics exam. Students will learn how to perform statistical analysis on TI-84 calculators as well as more traditional techniques.

Science

Physics: This course provides students with an introduction to the field of physics. Topics include motion, forces, work and energy, properties of solids, liquids and gases; elasticity, thermodynamics, acoustics, optics and modern physics.

 

AP Physics: This course provides students with an experience equivalent to an introductory college level physics course. The course will be challenging and is recommended for students who are committed to put a lot of efforts. It is expected that students taking AP Physics will have strong algebra skills.

 

Chemistry: It is an inquiry based laboratory course that prepares students for further studies in the sciences and develops problem solving skills. Major topics covered are atomic structure, bonding, reactions, states of matter, and solutions. The course is designed to prepare students planning to attend college who must complete a lab-based science course.

 

AP Chemistry: Students cultivate their understanding of chemistry through inquiry-based lab investigations as they explore the four Big Ideas: scale, proportion, and quantity; structure and properties of substances; transformations; and energy. Students will be prepared for AP Chemistry exam and will require commitments from students.

 

Biology: This course is designed to stimulate reasoning and understanding of major biological topics and concepts.  Students will develop basic biological concepts dealing with the chemical basis of life, cellular biology, energy systems, growth and division of cells, and special emphasis on nucleic acids and protein synthesis. Student laboratory sessions and projects are used to reinforce these topics.

 

AP Biology: The topics addressed include the learning objectives as set forth by the College Board to understand the four Big Ideas;  Big Idea #1: The process of evolution drives the diversity and unity of life; Big Idea #2: Biological systems utilize free energy and molecular building blocks to grow, to reproduce and to maintain dynamic homeostasis. Big Idea #3: Living systems store, retrieve, transmit and respond to information essential to life processes Big Idea #4: Biological systems interact and these systems and their interactions possess complex properties.

 

AP Environmental Science: Designed to be the equivalent of a one-semester introductory college course in environmental science, the curriculum for this course follows the syllabus published by the Advanced Placement Program of The College Board.  Included in the course are laboratory and field experiences.  Ecological principles; population, economics and environmental health; land and biological resources; physical resources; energy resources; and society and the environment are topics of study.

 

AP Computer Science: Students will be prepared to take AP test on May. The objectives of the course are: To develop a knowledge and understanding of the concepts of a higher level programming language, to give students a foundation in the design, construction, and analysis of programs, to hone problems solving skills, especially those associated with the study of computer programming, to give an understanding of issues and ideas in the larger world of computer science and computer programming.

Social Studies

World History: This course will engage students in the history of our world from 3000B.C. to 1914 A.D.  The main trend of the course will be how these events helped shape future events and the world’s current state.  There are four main scopes that students will use to analyze these events: through culture, economics, politics and religion.

 

U.S. History: This course is designed to explore the history of the United States beginning with a review of American beginnings up to 1877 up to the present day United States.

AP U.S. History: Emphasis is placed on critical and evaluative thinking skills, essay writing, interpretation of original documents and histography.  In addition, to the topics listed above, the course will emphasize a series of key themes throughout the year.  The themes will include discussions of American diversity, the history of slavery, the evolution of American culture, economic trends and transformations, environmental issues, the development of political institutions throughout American history, social reforms, diplomatic and intellectual history.

AP Psychology: The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.

AP Economics: The aim of an AP Economics course is to provide students with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in a typical college/university introductory macroeconomics or microeconomics course. AP Economics is designed to prepare students to take the AP Exams in Macroeconomics and Microeconomics (2 separate exams).

  • AP Macroeconomics: Advanced Placement Macroeconomics provides students with a thorough understanding of economic principles that apply to an economic system as a whole. The course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination and also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics.

  • AP Microeconomics: Advanced Placement Microeconomics provides students with a thorough understanding of economic principles that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within an economic system. The course places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets and includes the study of factor markets and of the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy.

 

Foreign Language:

  • Chinese 1: This course begins the sequence of the study of Chinese with the focus on Chinese culture and basic language skills, such as Pinyin (a phonetic system that uses English letters) and simple sentence structures. Students will be able to ask and answer questions with Chinese speakers about themselves, their family, hobbies, clothing and class-related topics. Students are required to recognize the most frequently used characters; writing is not required.

  • Chinese 2: This is an intensive course for students who have successfully completed Chinese 1 (studied at the high school or at the middle school). This course continues the study of Chinese with a focus on culturally enriched conversation topics such as weather, directions, dining out and experience at a doctor’s office. Students will be able to communicate fluently with native speakers on these topics, and read and write simple paragraphs with Chinese characters. Students will also utilize tools such as Chinese input software, pod-cast and other Internet-based resources to enhance their learning experiences. This course is taught primarily in Chinese.

  • Chinese 3: This course follows the successful completion of Chinese 2 or 2 Honors and continues the study of Chinese in depth. With culture heavily intertwined in the topics, students will further advance their language skills by discussing topics such as vacation, community, going shopping and one’s favorite TV programs. Reading in characters is heavily emphasized. Original movies and related TV programs will be introduced as discussion topics. This course is taught primarily in Chinese.

  • AP Chinese: The Advanced Placement course in Chinese Language and Culture is a university level course for which students may receive university credit upon successful completion of the Advanced Placement examination at the end of the course. The material in this course represents the culmination of the previous years of study of the Chinese language and culture, and has as its goal the refinement of the ability to use the language to speak, write, read, and listen at an advanced level of discourse. Summer work required.

  • French 1: This course begins the sequence of the study of French language and culture. The course emphasizes the four skills of speaking, writing, reading and listening that are assessed in both written and oral formats. Correct pronunciation and intonation as well as sound-spelling correlation and sound discrimination that differentiate words are an important part of this beginning course.

  • French 2: This intensive course, taught almost exclusively in French, is for students who have successfully completed French 1 (studied at the high school or at the middle school). There is an overall emphasis on the skills of speaking, writing, reading and listening, with an expectation that the students will be able to express themselves both in writing and in speaking in a spontaneous manner.

  • French 3: This is an intensive course that is taught almost exclusively in French. This course continues to study the French language and culture by means of the four skills of speaking, writing, reading and listening. Spontaneous “resumes” on French life are an integral part of this course. Emphasis is placed on personal writing and communication skills.

  • AP French: The Advanced Placement course in French Language is a university level course for which students may receive university credit upon successful completion of the Advanced Placement examination at the end of the course. The material in this course represents the culmination of the previous years of study of the French language and culture, and has as its goal the refinement of the ability to use the language to speak, write, read and listen at an advanced level of discourse. Summer work required.

  • Spanish 1: This course begins the sequence of the study of Spanish language and culture. The course emphasizes the four skills of speaking, writing, reading and listening that are assessed in both written and oral formats. Sound discrimination, pronunciation and cultural awareness of the Spanish-speaking world are an important part of this beginning course.

  • Spanish 2: This intensive course, taught almost exclusively in Spanish, is for students who have successfully completed Spanish 1 (studied at the high school or at the middle school) or Spanish 1B. There is an overall emphasis on the skills of speaking, writing, reading and listening, with an expectation that the students will be able to express themselves both in writing and in speaking in a spontaneous manner. There is a continued study of culture in the Spanish-speaking world through the use of short readings.

  • Spanish 3: This is an intensive course that is taught almost exclusively in Spanish. This course continues to study the Spanish language and culture by means of the four skills of speaking, writing, reading and listening. Emphasis is placed on the acquisition of reading and writing skills through the use of Spanish and Latin American short stories.

  • AP Spanish: The Advanced Placement course in Spanish Language is a university level course for which students may receive university credit upon successful completion of the Advanced Placement examination at the end of the course. The material in this course represents the culmination of the previous years of study of the Spanish language and culture, and has as its goal the refinement of the ability to use the language to speak, write, read and listen at an advanced level of discourse. Summer work required.

Physical Education & Wellness

Course places emphasis on personal fitness, sportsmanship, leadership and teamwork.

Arts

AP Studio Art (2-D Design): This course is designed for highly motivated students who are seriously interested in the study of art. AP Studio Art(2-D Design) demands significant commitment to the investigation of the formal and conceptual issues relating to the Elements of Art and Principles of Design. The final assessment for AP Studio Art is not based on a written exam; instead, students submit portfolios for evaluation at the end of the school year. AP portfolios are assessed on (1) a sense of quality in a student’s work; (2) the student’s concentration on a particular visual interest or problem; and (3) the student’s need for breadth of experience in the formal, technical and expressive means of the artist.

Bible

It is an introductory course to the Old and New Testaments (their contents, historical backgrounds, and major themes) and to appropriate strategies for interpretation of the Bible. Students will acquire a greater and deeper understanding of the history, religion, ethics, literature, and text of the Christian Bible, the basic authority for Christian faith and practice. Students will learn to appropriate critically informed strategies for the interpretation of the Bible—learning various critical perspectives needed to evaluate contemporary interpretations of the Bible. With this broader, more in-depth understanding of the Christian Scriptures, students will be better enabled and better equipped to have informed engagement with others from a Christian perspective—a critical dimension of a transformational Christian education.